mindbending

Author Topic: Pretty Maths?  (Read 2588 times)

CerebralJam

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Pretty Maths?
« on: April 03, 2009, 11:55:18 AM »
Wasn't sure if Maths was a Science so put this here anyway...

Found this:  The Art of Mathematics

I'm utterly confused by maths as usual - but rather in awe of this... :-) 

Maybe I should have put it under Art?  Hehe!
Life is the art of drawing without an eraser. John W Gardner
 

Implosion

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Re: Pretty Maths?
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2009, 03:42:51 AM »
Yes, ... fractals.  Math is indeed the universal language.  It seems that it relates to everything in life and is almost like a web, in that it brings everything together.

The principles behind dynamical systems and fractal patterns also goes along with the reality that nothing is truly random.  I read a fascinating book entitled Nature's Numbers - The Unreal Reality of Mathematics, by Ian Stewart.  It's my favorite book to date, actually.  I think I've read it several times. 

In it, is discussed the phenomenon of Fibonacci (which is related to fractals) numbers and the golden ratio... which relate to recurring patterns, functioning and efficient proportions, and even things that appeal aesthetically to the  human eye.  Everything from the angle of the curve of a growing snail shell to the particular patterns blown across the sand dunes of a desert is directly related to mathematical equations.  Everything in nature is organized to a T and things that appear random, are, in fact, as precise as the complex inner workings of a watch.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RE2Lu65XxTU&feature=related#

You can translate mathematical equations into what we could perceive as a form of art in the way of dynamical systems and fractal patterns.  You can also translate the mathematical equations of the architecture of a building into musical score and actually 'play' the architecture of the walls around you. 

And think of art itself.  Most all art, whether concrete or abstract, is all geometry.  Geometry is math.  You can also use sound waves to create art.  For instance, sound waves on a resonating table produce Chladni patterns in salt or sand.  The theory behind this is much the same, basically related to mathematical equations... physics related equations, to be exact.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qf0t4qIVWF4/#]Chladni  (This one's loud, be prepared).


Truly fascinating subject, Janet!
« Last Edit: February 20, 2010, 05:30:09 PM by CerebralJam »
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Freethinkingman

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Re: Pretty Maths?
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2010, 03:45:47 PM »
anyone who has any interest in actually learning math, or physics, in bite sized chunks, you cannot find a better resource than this. i heartily endorse it.

 http://www.khanacademy.org/

CerebralJam

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Re: Pretty Maths?
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2010, 05:29:22 PM »
Nice link... okay, before I go trying stuff out, will I get the same answers ie you lot spell things differently, do your calendar differently,  maybe 2+3=6-1  :P   Will have a little lookie round because I think I missed a lot of the concepts and have always struggled with some stuff. 
Life is the art of drawing without an eraser. John W Gardner
 

Ricky8Aberle

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Re: Pretty Maths?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2010, 11:52:53 AM »
Have anyone here read The Art of Mathematics Book By Marvin J. Greenberg ? This book is intended for non-mathematicians and is, according to the author, descriptive rather than precise, it still should not purvey misleading information.

ChelseaFrancis

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Re: Pretty Maths?
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2011, 05:28:57 AM »
Have anyone here read The Art of Mathematics Book By Marvin J. Greenberg ? This book is intended for non-mathematicians and is, according to the author, descriptive rather than precise, it still should not purvey misleading information.


I read this book. And it's so awesome, who has been bored by high school algebra or baffled by college calculus will find Jerry King’s THE ART OF MATHEMATICS a delight and a revelation.